Stonehenge Astronomical Observatory

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Many ground-breaking discoveries are presented in “Stonehenge Astronomical Observatory”. You will not find this information in any other book at this time. Good evidence has been found which demonstrates that Stonehenge was indeed an observatory. The principle of operation is very simple, but the implemention is remarkably complex, which then permits the observation and mapping of the entire visible sky, not just of the sun and moon positions, but of the stars and planets also. Writing this book has been a tremendous journey of discovery for me, and I do feel enormously privileged to have done it. At times I have had an overwhelming sense of the close presence of the people of Stonehenge. This can only come from an understanding and empathy with their lives and their experiences, which in many ways are very much our own experiences, but also in many ways are so different. The journey of discovery has only just begun however, and there is so much more to see in the coming months and years. My findings are presented in a logical way, and are very much grounded in careful observations. I have re-interpreted a number of long-held assumptions, which I feel make a much more satisfying and logical account of the phases of construction of Stonehenge. This has led me to devise a new theory for its decline and destruction. This theory may seem far-fetched at first, but there is a logical progression, and it accounts for the mysterious Y and Z holes, which have been a puzzle for so long. It will be interesting to see how our collective understanding of the people of Stonehenge broadens and deepens in the future. Nevertheless, I do have a strong sense that the people of Stonehenge are calling out to us across the millennia, a very wide gap that appears to divide us. Their story is more than one of purely academic interest, and we must surely learn from their wisdom, and indeed disasters, and so to apply that knowledge to the world of today.

Hugo Jenks